Pleasure, pride…pain

You are described as a good employee when you follow the requirements of your job description to the letter.

Often, a form of reward comes your way to motivate you to keep up the good work when your efforts assist in the attainment of overall corporate objectives.

Such an employee is often recommended as a model worker whose positive traits should be adopted.

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Management, upon recognizing and rewarding the efforts of such an employee, expects a two-pronged result; the individual in question to raise up efforts a notch higher, and others around to realize that a determined effort to assist in the overall growth and development agenda of the organization is duly recognized and rewarded.

And this is where the slippery ground comes in.

Such an employee is tempted to conclude that he has the Midas touch to stimulate a course of action that is recognized by the higher authorities, as compared to co – workers who may be doing their bit.

To conclude that their individual effort was the determining factor in the success story initiates a trend that might prove to be catastrophic if preventive measures are not employed.

Pride, when sealed fuels the trip down a road to shame when care isn’t taken to adequately manage the repercussions of ideas that may overwhelm the employee in question.

Various studies have been assembled to determine the general triggering factor behind human activity.

In the first few weeks on a job, the average employee works with a level of zeal that is usually admired.

The immediate superior would certainly notice and (correctly) assume that that is usually a characteristic of new brooms.

Time flies and the question of whether it is a natural attitude of the individual or the usual “early days enthusiasm” of every new employee is certainly answered.

If it turns out to be a natural mannerism, the worker is applauded and often recommended in the event of a promotion or a similar benefit. This facilitates a speedy rise up the corporate ladder, especially if the required know-how is added as well.

The higher one progresses in a working environment, more responsible that individual is expected to become.

Characteristics that should be exhibited by a superior should be those that would compel the subordinate to work hard in expectation of rewards that may have been awarded the superior in the course of his ascent to the top.

It is in such an instance that the lower-ranked worker activates his ambitious acumen in anticipation of recognition of a sort which may compel him to go the extra mile in the future.

A personal, constantly assessed desire to reach the highest echelons of power in a corporate setup is a natural want of all who find themselves engaged in a form of employment.

A probable notice of the pleasures that a superior executive enjoys motivates those in the lower ranks to work their way up, with hard work and strategy.

Pride, in a sense, is a natural by-product of efforts that result in success. It is normal for every employee to realize that they were either part of or the motivating force behind a result that projects the business in a positive light.

The inability to manage the after-effects of actions is the catalyst for danger all should be wary of. Being proud of your achievements is only half the story.

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